asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter

asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking
asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking

Summer is coming in fast, and I cannot believe it is here again. Every year, from about late September onward, I anxiously await summer's return, and because I want it to be here again so badly, I feel like the colder months drag on and on ...... but not this year. This year it feels like hardly any time has passed. This year it feels like it was not that long ago that I was making myself a smoothie and heading to the beach to watch michael surf. Maybe it's because we had a mild winter, or maybe it's because time is moving faster ..... either way, I cannot wait to embrace summer and all the wonderful things it brings to life. 

I am planting my garden this weekend, late I know, but my less than green thumb doesn't have the best luck with growing from seeds, so I used sprouted plants. I cannot wait for the mornings when I can walk out to the garden and snip off some kale and mint for my smoothies, and arugula and tomatoes for my salads. But before I get too far ahead of myself, I am going to continue to relish in the last of the spring veggies. The asparagus, ramps, wild garlic, artichokes, some of my favorites that will be gone too quick to make way for all the tomatoes and zucchini. 

A couple of summers back, I made this miso butter, and covered my summer veggies in it. It was then that I declaired that miso butter is basically crack that can make just about anything taste amazing, and that if I am going to treat myself to some butter, there better be miso in that butter. So this time I am doing the same, but to asparagus, and I have to say ...even though miso butter can make anything taste amazing, it has a particularly special effect on sautéed asparagus. Trust me on this. Throw some wild garlic in there, as well as some yummy fava beans, and I cannot think of a better way to celebrate the last of the spring veggies, and the un-offical beginning of summer. 

asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking
asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking
asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking
asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking
asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking
asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter | what's cooking good looking

asparagus + fava beans + wild garlic miso butter

SERVES 2-4 

INGREDIENTS

for the miso butter:
1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) of butter, room temperature
2 tablespoons of white miso
2 tablespoons of minced wild garlic (or chives, or green onions) 

for the asparagus + favas:
about 2 dozen asparagus spears, trimmed
10 fava bean pods, beans removed and peeled, and then roughly chopped
olive oil
black pepper

METHOD

Make the miso butter:

  • In a small bowl, mix the butter, miso, and wild garlic until evenly incorporated. Set aside until you're ready to use. You can also do this in advance and store in the fridge for whenever you're ready to use. You can form it into a log, using plastic wrap, or you can keep in in the small bowl, covered. 

Cook the asparagus + fava beans, and serve:

  • In a large cast iron, heat a couple tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat. Add the asparagus, and cook for several minutes, stirring occasionally, until the asparagus is brown and fork tender. Be careful not to overcook though, you do not want mushy asparagus. Remove and set aside on a serving plate. 
  • In the same pan, add a little more oil, and then the fava beans. Cook for a few minutes, until tender. Remove and sprinkle over the asparagus. 
  • Add a spoonful of the miso butter to the asparagus and fava beans and some black pepper, and toss to evenly coat. Serve warm. 

rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf)

rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking
rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking

Every Spring when we get teased with warm, sunny days ..... my rhubarb-dar starts to go off, and I go on a mad (slightly premature) hunt all over nyc for my favorite, super-seasonal treat. I always start with the farmers market, and if I don't find any there, then I make my way to whole foods (which is usually a toss up), and then lastly I'll hit up my most reliable rhubarb source (Dean + Deluca) and bingo. I know I can almost always find rhubarb (prematurely) when my rhubarb-dar goes off early and I just need to have some. 

The first day my rhubarb-dar went off this season, Michael and I were wandering around the city and ended up at the farmers market. It was such a gorgeous day and the market was FILLED with ramps and fiddleheads, and one little stand with a small amount of rhubarb. I should have bought all of the rhubarb as soon as I spotted it, but we wandered a little more and when I went back someone had bought ALL of the rhubarb. I was so devastated. Also, that person is my soulmate. So, I guess you know what happened next. I did not give up until I found some more rhubarb, and brought it home to cook down and throw into the freezer. I was hopping on a plane the next day to the west coat and I wanted my rhubarb ready as soon as I got home. 

Last week was our anniversary and we spent it driving all up the west coast, spending time along the way in san diego, LA, big sur, and napa .............. oh!! and we also stumbled on the artichoke "capital of the world" in castroville, CA, and I couldn't have been happier to snapchat my way around their artichoke monuments and eat at the all-artichoke restaurant. The whole trip was a super fun way to celebrate four years of marriage, and the drive along the pacific coast highway was something I have always wanted to do. I'm an ocean girl, and being near the ocean is pretty much all I need to be happy. That, and artichokes. The ocean + artichokes + really good food + rhubarb + Michael (also our dog and some good friends) are all I really need to be happy. 

This rhubarb creation is so simple to throw together, and the strawberry crunch is a super addicting topping that would also be great over ice cream or so many other desserts. I have made a number of rhubarb recipes for this blog, but not until this recipe have I paired rhubarb with strawberry, it's perfect mate. This crunch is a unique way to incorporate the strawberry, and this panna cotta is my new favorite way to celebrate rhubarb and spring and all the goodness that comes with this time of year! 

rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking
rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking
rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking
rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking
rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking
rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) | what's cooking good looking

rhubarb panna cotta + strawberry coconut crunch (df+gf) 

SERVES 4-6 

INGREDIENTS

for the panna cotta:
4 cups of rhubarb (5-8 stalks depending on how big they are), green tops discarded, red-ish parts diced
1/2 cup of granulated coconut sugar (maple syrup works as well if you prefer)
1/4 teaspoon of sea salt
1 vanilla bean, scraped (or 1 tablespoon of vanilla extract) 
14oz can of full fat coconut milk
2 tablespoons of agar flakes

for the strawberry coconut crunch:
3/4 cup of frozen strawberries
1 teaspoon of vanilla
1/4 teaspoon of sea salt
2 tablespoons of maple syrup
2 tablespoons of brown rice syrup
1 cup of thick coconut flakes
1/2 cup of rolled oats

garnish: several mint leaves (chopped or whole) 
 

METHOD

Cook down the rhubarb + make the panna cotta:

  • Heat a large, heavy bottomed pot over medium-low heat and add the rhubarb, sugar and salt. Cook for about 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the rhubarb is soft. Watch the mixture and make sure it does not start to boil and bubble, you do not want the rhubarb to burn. Mash the rhubarb with a potato masher in order to get a (semi) smooth consistency. 
  • Add the vanilla bean, coconut milk, agar flakes, and stir to combine. Cook for another 20 minutes, while stirring occasionally, and make sure the mixture does not come to a boil. If it does, turn the heat down slightly.
  • Using an immersion blender, blend the mixture until smooth. You can also do this using a food processor or blender. Ladle the mixture into small, individual bowls. For mine, I used 4" mini staub pots (which you see in the photos) but you can use any vessel (ramekins, mini bowls) in any size that you choose. At the 4" size, I filled up 4 of those mini pots. 
  • Refrigerate for a minimun of 3 hours, or overnight, before serving. 

While the panna cotta is setting, make the strawberry coconut crunch:

  • Pre-heat the oven to 300º. Line a small baking sheet with parchment paper. 
  • Using a food processor, blend the frozen strawberries, vanilla, salt, and maple syrup until smooth. Remove the blade (so you won't have to worry about stickiness) and add the brown rice syrup. Stir with a spoon to incorporate. Add the coconut flakes and oats and stir until evenly coated. 
  • Pour the strawberry coconut mixture onto the baking sheet, and spread it out so it's in one, thin layer. Bake for 15 minutes, remove and stir up the ingredients and spread them out again. Bake for another 15 minutes. At this point the mixture should be slightly brown, however, it might not seem super crunchy yet, but it will get more crunchy as it cools. Let it cool, and if it is not crunchy enough, return it to the oven for another few minutes and then let it cool again. 

Assemble, and serve:

  • You can either serve these in their bowls/vessels, or you can remove them from their vessel and serve them on a small plate. However you chose to serve them, top them with a generous helping of the strawberry coconut crunch and also with a couple of leaves of mint (chopped or whole). Enjoy! 

baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burt lemon vinaigrette

baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burt lemon vinaigrette  | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burt lemon vinaigrette  | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burt lemon vinaigrette  | what's cooking good looking

Our workshop in Italy was two weeks ago, and I am still dreaming about the gorgeous, white-washed farmhouse where we hosted everyone, as well as ALLLL of the artichokes, pasta, and (amazing) olive oil I devoured. Having participated in a few workshops before, the one thing I knew for sure going into this one was that the students who would be arriving would (at the very least) share commonalities in food, photography, and travel. I love meeting new people, and I found that these workshop were one of the best ways to form bonds with different types of people who have similar interests. 

When our group gathered for the first time over aperol spritzes and tomato toasts, I had a chance to meet and chat with everyone, and the thing I was most excited about with our group was the diversity and the distances everyone traveled to get to Puglia. We had one student who came all the way from New Zeland, a few from Europe, one Canadian (minus our other two teachers), and a several others from all over the US. This made me so happy, and also made me appreciate the power that the internet and social media has to connect us with people from all over the world. Without this technology that makes our world so flat, these experiences and this group of people would not come together so easily. 

Being around people who were so eager to learn, and eager to start careers (or just a passionate hobby) in food and/or photography sent a little jolt through me. It inspired me and re-invigorated me to keep learning and keep on creating. I've been replaying my favorite memories from our workshop in my mind so I can hold on to these feeling for as long as possible. 

I also keep replaying how delicious the food was. I am sure you do that too after you've had a few days of good eating. Anyone who knows me knows that artichokes are one of my favorite vegetables, and luckily it was artichoke season while we were in Italy. We had artichokes a few times, but I feel like I was just getting warmed up, so the first thing I was craving when I got home were some warm, crispy, baby artichokes. 

Artichokes are labor intensive, but if you love artichokes as much as I do you will find it is a labor of love. If artichokes weren't so time consuming to prepare, I would probably eat them every day, all spring long ...... but maybe the fact that they take a little more effort is what makes them so special, and such a treat. If you search artichoke on my blog, you will see that I am always trying to come up with new, creative ways to prepare them, but it's hard to deny that one of the best ways to enjoy these guys is simply with lemon, garlic, olive oil, and salt. To play off of that classic preparation, I burnt some meyer lemons to bring out their sweetness, and made them into a vinaigrette to drizzle over this warm, springy salad. A simple, delicious way to get an artichoke fix. 

baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burt lemon vinaigrette  | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt lemon vinaigrette | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt lemon vinaigrette | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt lemon vinaigrette | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt lemon vinaigrette | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt lemon vinaigrette | what's cooking good looking
baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt lemon vinaigrette | what's cooking good looking

baby artichoke salad with white beans + asparagus + pea shoots + burnt meyer lemon vinaigrette

SERVES 2-4

INGREDIENTS

for the vinaigrette:
1 large meyer lemon (or regular lemon), slice into 1/2" thick rounds
1 tablespoon of fresh oregano
1 small garlic clove
1/4 teaspoon of sea salt
pepper to taste
(approx) 1/2 cup of extra virgin olive oil

for the salad:
1 dozen baby artichokes
1/2 a lemon
a couple of tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup of water
1  cup of cooked (or canned) white beans (rinsed, if canned) 
1 dozen asparagus, trimmed and sliced in half
a generous handful of pea shoots
salt + pepper

METHOD

Make the vinaigrette:

  • Pre-heat the broiler. 
  • Place the sliced lemons onto a baking sheet and broil for approx 5 mins on each side, until the lemons are charred around the edges. Watch them carefully, because broiler cooking times vary greatly and you do not want them to burn. 
  • Once they are cool enough to touch, place lemon center (making sure to get all of their juices as well) into the food processor. Discard any seeds, and the rinds. 
  • Add the remaining ingredients, except for the olive oil, into the food processor and pulse until chopped. Then, while the food processor is running, add in the oil in a slow stream. Once you've added 1/2 a cup, taste and adjust and seasoning or add more oil if necessary. Set aside until you're ready to dress the salad. 

Prep + cook the artichokes:

  • Prepare a medium sized bowl with water, the juice of 1/2 a lemon (just throw the lemon in once you've juiced it) and some ice. This will keep the artichokes from oxidizing. 
  • Pull off and discard the dark green outer leaves until you get to the tender, inner yellow ones.  Cut off the top 1/4 inch (where the prickly bits are) and trim off the bottom 1/4" of the stem. Then, using a paring knife, shave off the rough edges around the base of the artichoke. Slice the artichoke in half and place it in the bowl of lemon water. Repeat until all of the artichokes are trimmed. 
  • Heat a wok-style pan over medium-high heat  (or a regular medium-sized frying pan will do). Drizzle a little olive oil, and then place the artichokes into the pan, flat side down. Let them cook for about 2 minutes, and then add the water, lower the heat to medium. Cover, and allow the artichokes to steam for 5 minutes. Remove the cover and allow the rest of the water to evaporate. Once the water has evaporated, then drizzle a little more oil, raise the heat again slightly, and cook until the artichokes are brown around the edges. Set aside until you're ready to assemble the salad. 

Saute the asparagus, and assemble the salad:

  • In the same pan you cooked the artichokes, heat some oil over medium heat and add the asparagus. Cook for a few minutes until tender and browning. Season with salt and pepper, toss to combine, and remove them from the heat. 
  • Either in one large serving plate, or individual plates, assemble the salad. Lay the asparagus down, then top with the beans, and some pea shoots. Pour about half of the vinaigrette over the artichokes (that are in a separate bowl), and toss until they are evenly coated (you can skip this step if you don't want to mess up a bowl, and just drizzle the dressing over the entire salad). Drizzle the remaining vinaigrette over the asparagus and beans, and then add the artichokes on top. Enjoy! 

swiss chard stem + ramp spring rolls with miso green goddess dipping sauce

chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking

I've been on an unsubscribing and deleting frenzy lately. Maybe it's the new-age version of spring cleaning, but something inside me is screaming to purge. It started with me reading The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up . Like so many people who have picked up that book, I was immediately inspired  to go through my entire closet, and give away those shirts and shoes that I look at and go: MEH. I got rid of five giant bags of stuff. FIVE bags! I didn't even know I had that many clothes, or rather, so many clothes that I didn't love so much. It felt so good, I started doing it in all other areas of my life. 

If you've read the book, you know that she tells you to do it all at once, but since I convinced myself that I will probably never dedicate a whole day or weekend to purging and cleaning .... I did it my way. It worked for me, it was contagious, and even though I didn't follow her instructions exactly, the need to purge and rid my life of things that I do not love is now something that is in me, and it will probably never go away. It crept it's way into my digital life as well. I deleted so many emails last weekend that my phone had a total freak out. It was like: GAH! What are you doing? It took a day or two for it to calm down, and now I think my phone, like me, is much happier without holding on to so much dead weight. 

What is it about spring that makes us want to clean up our closest, clean up our emails, and clean up our act? It is because the weather is getting warmer and we want to be our best to enjoy every minute of the sunshine? Is it that we hibernate in the winter and collect things and dust, and when the spring comes around we have the urge to get rid of that thick, blah layer of stuff? Who knows, but whatever the reason is, I love it. I love spring, and I love to clean and purge. 

The first signs of spring are happening in NYC, even if the weather cannot make up it's mind. Ramps have made an appearance, and the sun has shown it's warmth on a couple of occasions. My winter clothes are making their way to the back of the closet, and the sweaters that I no longer love are making their way to Goodwill. Spring and summer always feel so much sweeter after enduring the grueling winter.  

So, let's celebrate spring with one of my favorite snack-y foods that has spring in it's name. And while we are at it, I am going to throw my favorite spring allium in there, the ramp. You probably know what ramps are, they are spring's trendiest new food, but if you have never heard of them or cannot find them, any green onion-type veggie will do. I am also doing a little spring cleaning with this recipe, by getting the most out of each veggie. Using the stems, which sometimes get discarded, and using leftover parts of veggies from the spring roll, and adding them to this super tasty and healthy green goddess dipping sauce. 

chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking
chard stem + ramp spring rolls | what's cooking good looking

swiss chard stems + ramp spring rolls with miso green goddess dipping sauce 

MAKES
about 5 spring rolls

INGREDIENTS

 1 bunch of swiss chard (about 10 leaves), stems separated from the leaves
olive oil
salt + pepper

5 ramps, white and green parts separated
1 avocado (split in half, one half for the rolls and the other for the sauce)
1 small cucumber, peeled and sliced into 3" long matchsticks
a large handful of microgreens

5-6 large spring roll skins

for the green goddess dipping sauce:
3 swiss (green) chard leaves (reserved from the rolls) 
5 of the white parts of the ramps (reserved from the rolls)
the other half of the avocado (reserved from the rolls)
1 small garlic clove
1/2 teaspoon of sweet white miso
10 basil leaves
1/4 cup of parsley
the juice of 1/2 lemon
a pinch of salt (if necessary)

METHOD

*Pre-heat the oven to 375º

Prep the veggies + making the dipping sauce:

  • Chop the cucumber and the chard stems into matchsticks, no longer than 3". The chard stems you will want to make sure are extra skinny, you may even want to make them smaller than 3", because they can be chewy, so the smaller they are, the easier they are to eat in the spring roll. Slice one half of the avocado into lengthwise slices, and slice the green parts of the ramps in half lengthwise. 
  • Then, to make the dipping sauce, place 3 of the chard leaves, the white parts of the ramps, the other half of the avocado, 1 small garlic clove, the miso, basil, parsley, and lemon juice into the food processor. Pulse a few times to chop the ingredients, and then add water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until it's smooth. Taste and add salt or adjust and seasoning necessary. Set aside until you're ready to serve. 

Roast the chard stems:

  • Place the chard stems onto a baking sheet, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for about 20 minutes until tender. Remove, and allow to cool before adding to the rolls. 

Roll the spring rolls:

  • Have all of your ingredients, including the dipping sauce, near your rolling station. Fill a large, shallow bowl with warm water. Dip the spring roll skin into the water for about 10-15 second, until pliable, and then place it onto a clean, flat surface. Stack the ramp greens, cucumber, chard stems, and avocado in the center of the spring roll. Add a small spoonful of the sauce and finish with a pinch of microgreens. Fold the bottom half of the spring roll snugly over the filling, and then fold in the sides. Finish by rolling the ingredients away from you until it  is tightly wrapped. Repeat these steps until you've used all of the ingredients. If you like, you can use a serrated knife to cut the rolls in half down the center. Serve with the remaining dipping sauce on the side.  

golden bell pepper soup + avocado+ cilantro

golden bell pepper soup + avocado + puffed rice | what's cooking good looking
golden bell pepper soup + avocado + puffed rice | what's cooking good looking

I met Amie about a year ago at a blogger pot luck, and my immediate impression  was ..... wow! this girl has such positive, infectious energy! And, that's exactly the feeling you get when you open her new cookbook. After getting to know Amie (we are actually neighbors in NYC, and enjoy catching up while strolling around the neighborhood), I can say with first hand experience, that Amie's latest book, Eat Clean, comes from the most genuine place of wanting to help others live the healthiest, most vibrant life by way of clean eating, and detoxing your home environment.  

Amie experienced one of the worst, most nightmarish health scares of anyone I have met, and she was able to heal herself by completely detoxing her life, from the food she was eating to the products she was bringing into her home. She has so much knowledge on this subject (which she so generously shares throughout the book) it is so incredibly helpful for anyone, not just people who are sick and trying to get better, but also for people who want to stay away from the scary toxic stuff and live a cleaner, healthier life. She shares her knowledge in a way that it not at all judgy or preachy, she just wants you take her info, and customize it to what works for you. 

You know that I am such a believer in the connection that clean food can have on your overall wellbeing, and even though I am not 100% clean 100% of the time, I know that anyone can benefit from making even the smallest change here and there in order to feel some sort of improvement. Once you catch that happy, healthy vibrant feeling, it's hard to shake it. It stays with you, and even if you get away from it, you'll always want to go back there. So it's nice to pick up a new book, like Amie's, and read it to get re-inspired to be your best and healthiest.  

This golden yellow bell pepper soup I am sharing today is from Amie's book. It  is so simple to throw together and so zingy and delicious. It's the perfect soup for right now (for us in NYC) where the weather has been torture, and I am in need of some brightness to cheer up these unseasonably cold, grey days. I also enjoyed this chilled the other day (which was just as delicious) and closed my eyes and imagined I was eating gazpacho on the beach in the summer ....... soon enough! 

golden bell pepper soup + avocado + puffed rice | what's cooking good looking
yellow-bell-pepper-soup-WCGL-05.jpg
golden bell pepper soup + avocado + puffed rice | what's cooking good looking
golden bell pepper soup + avocado + puffed rice | what's cooking good looking
golden bell pepper soup + avocado + puffed rice | what's cooking good looking

golden bell pepper soup + avocado + cilantro 

This recipe is from Amie Valpone's book, Eating Clean, on pg. 182. Below, I am presenting the recipe exactly how Amie does in the book, but I made a few changes based on what I had on hand. I did not have celery, so I left that out. I also was not able to find marjoram, so I used thyme instead. I didn't have any pre-made veggie broth, so I actually just used water with a little extra salt, and it was still very flavorful. Lastly, I added about two dashes of turmeric and a squeeze of the juice of half a lemon, because I love the zing that lemon gives to soup. 

SEVRES 4-6 

INGREDIENTS 

1/2 cup of extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion, diced
2 medium carrots, diced
1 celery stalk, diced
sea salt + pepper
8 yellow (or orange or red) bell peppers, chopped
1 large sweet potato, peeled and chopped
4 cups of low-sodium vegetable broth (preferably homemade)
1 tablespoon of fresh marjoram, finely chopped

optional toppings:
1 avocado, sliced
a handful of chopped cilantro
croutons (gluten-free, if necessary) 
*I used a handful of puffed rice that I had leftover from the previous recipe

METHOD

  • In a large pot, heat the oil over medium heat and add the onions, carrots, celery, a pinch of salt and some black pepper. Cook for several minutes until all of the vegetables are tender. Add in the peppers and cook until soft, about 6 minutes. Add the sweet potato, season with a little more salt and pepper, and add the broth. Bring to a boil, and then lower the heat to low and simmer for about 20 minute until all of the vegetables are tender. 
  • Carefully transfer the soup to a blender, do this in batches if your blender is not large enough, and process until smooth. Taste, and adjust any seasoning necessary (this is where I added a squeeze of lemon juice, if you would like to do the same), and blend one last time. Return the soup to the pot, and keep warm until serving. To serve, ladle into bowls and finish with the toppings of your choice.