collard wraps with roasted veggies, quinoa, brown rice + mustard miso

collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking

I chopped several inches off my hair the other day. It might not sounds like that big of a big deal, but it was for me. For the past 10 or so years, I have gone to my hairdresser and requested the same …. Just a trim, not too much, same as last time, instructions.

He chopped off a little more than I asked for, and definitely more than what was in my comfort zone, but I needed to desperately. I needed to get rid of that dead weight..

Cutting your hair or anything that involves changing your look is incredibly liberating. I honestly felt like a brand-spanking new person. Initially I was nervous about what Michael would think, but my feelings of wahooo!!!!  totally took over. I really didn’t care what anyone thought, something inside me wanted this so bad I didn’t care if anyone, including my husband, liked it or not.  (For the record, I could probably get a hot pink mohawk, and Michael would still probably tell me I looked great).

I feel like this might have something to do with my recent spirutal makesover. … you know, the one we talked about last week. After two sessions with the reiki healher, something inside me was screaming for a change, screaming to shake it up.

Despite the fact that I have these new chopped locks, and a newly healed spirit, I still have a bit of craziness going on in my life. Seriously, who doesn’t. I am eating lunch away from home on most days (not my norm, but I know it is the norm for most of my office working friends). I refuse to eat takeout every day, I reserve takeout for only those days where it is totally necessary. When I do bring lunch, I often utilize leftovers, or my grains and beans that I have made for the week.  A salads in a jar work well for this and I do make those often, but more recently, to shake things up, I’ve been throwing together these collard wraps with whatever it is I have in my fridge.

This version I am sharing with you today is super flexile, but it also is the more typial version I’ve been making since I usually have quinoa, rice, or some grain that is pre-cooked in my fridge. In the winter months, a tray of roasted veggies happens often, so leftovers from that is usually around too. I quickly throw together a sauce, like this two minture mustard-miso, and add any crunch and zing I can find in my fridge and pantry, and I have a super-nourishing lunch on the go.

collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking
collard wraps with roasted veggies + mustard  miso | what's cooking good looking

 

collard wraps with roasted veggies, quinoa, brown rice + miso mustard

MAKES
3-4 wraps

INGREDIENTS

½ cup of brown rice
½ cup of quinoa

3 large carrots, cut into thin 2” sticks
2 large beets, cut into thin 2” sticks
6oz (about 10) shiitake mushrooms (caps only), thinly sliced
a drizzle of neutral, high-heat oil (grapeseed, sunflower)
tamari or braggs aminos or low sodium soy sauce

6-8 large collard wraps

for the mustard miso:
2 tablespoons of dijon mustard
1 teaspoon of sweet white miso
2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon of tamari
1 teaspoon of toasted sesame oil
2 teaspoons of hot sauce
2-3 tablespoons of water

Optional additions to the wrap: avocado, microgreens, sesame seeds (or gomasio), pumpkin seeds, nuts, herbs, more hot sauce.

Also, options for secure the wraps: several toothpicks, or several long pieces of green onion (white parts removed)

METHOD

*Pre-heat the oven to 400º

Cook the brown rice + quinoa

  • Cook the quinoa and brown rice according to instructions (brown rice should take about 45-50 minutes, and quinoa about 15).
  • When both have cooked completely. Add them to the same pot or a large bowl, stir, and set aside, covered, until you’re ready to assemble the wraps.

Roast the veggies

  • Place the carrot and beets on a parchment lined baking sheet, drizzle with the oil, and drizzle with the tamari or braggs aminos.
  • Place the shiitakes on a separate parchment lined baking sheet (this is so the beets do not stain the super-absorbent mushrooms, but if you don’t mind feel free to use the same tray). Drizzle with oil and tamari (or aminos).
  • Roast the veggies for 20-30 minutes. You want the veggies to be tender (but not mushy) and the edges to be brown. I also like the mushrooms to be crispy. When they are done, remove, and set aside until you’re ready to assemble the wraps.

While the veggies are roasting, make the mustard miso

  • Combine all of the ingredients, except for the water, in a small bowl. Whisk to combine, making sure to smooth out any lumps from the miso.
  • Then, add the water one tablespoon at a time until you have the consistency you desire. I find that 2-3 gives the right consistency.

Prep the collards, and assemble the wraps

  •  To prepare the collards for wrapping, carefully remove the center rib. Then, place one collard on top of the other, facing the opposite directions so that you cover any gaps from the removed center rib. If there is any overlap, which is likely, then neatly trip around the edges of the collards so they match in size. 
  • To assemble, drizzle some mustard miso over the center or the wrap. Then place a large spoonful of the quinoa / brown rice mixture, and some of the carrots, beets, and mushrooms on top. Drizzle a little more mustard miso, and fishing with any additional toppings.
  • To wrap the collards (follow the pictures above). Fold up the bottom of the collard halfway. Then, fold over the right side and then the left side. Secure with a toothpick, or you can also tie a green onion (or two) around to secure the wrap.